How To Find A Job, Despite The Recession!

by Millionaire Mommy Next Door on April 17, 2009

in Economy,How To Guide,Making Money,Resources

With 13.2 million people currently unemployed in the United States, ABC’s television program, The View, aired a themed show this week on jobs: where to find one, how to get one, what to do if you become unemployed, job ideas for stay-at-home moms, and how to start a “job club”.

Because this is such a timely topic (everyone knows at least one person who has lost a job during this recession), I took notes to share with you. Please share this post with the people in your life who are needing some encouraging, constructive support right now. This post is LOADED with helpful links and resources!

Andrew Serwer, managing editor of Fortune magazine, reports that the lowest unemployment rates are in the farming and ranching industries, ranking states like Wyoming and South Dakota lowest in unemployment.

Ah, but you’re not a farmer or a cowboy? Serwer reports that the following industries are also fairing relatively well right now:

  • retail trade
  • health care
  • finance, insurance
  • professional and business services
  • state and local government
  • accommodations and food services

Jobs that should grow with the President’s stimulus programs include:

  • technology
  • education

What industries are NOT likely to be hiring now?

  • construction
  • manufacturing
  • mining
  • real estate
  • arts, entertainment
  • transportation
  • warehousing
  • utilities

Here are two specific companies that ARE hiring today:

  • Wal-Mart is opening 150 new stores across the country and is hiring store managers, human resource personnel, sales clerks, and more. They are willing to train people who have a strong work ethic.
  • HCA Healthcare reports 9,000 available job openings for nursing, x-ray technicians, physical therapists, secretaries, administrative and more.

Marcus Buckingham, career expert and author of The Truth About You: Your Secret to Success, reports that it is taking 120 days on average to land a job. He offers his top ten things to do if you become unemployed:

1) Financial assessment: Do a thorough review of your current financial situation. What costs can you eliminate or reduce starting today? Cancel your cable package, eat at home, stop buying things — or buy them used. Hoard your cash.

2) Self-assessment: Re-evaluate what your strengths, interests and passions are and how you can best contribute to a company. Discuss your ideas with someone who is objective, such as an open-minded friend, a coach, or a counselor.

3) Update your resume: Customize it for each specific job that you are applying for. Keep it simple — filling your resume with irrelevant details is distracting. Highlight relevant experiences and describe your strengths using quantifiable verbs (“organized, saved”). Be specific about the results you have achieved and the contributions you have made to the business. Contact the people you intend to use as references. Only include those references you are confident will give you a favorable review.

4) Hire yourself as a headhunter: Treat FINDING a job AS a job, with a 9 to 5 structure. Establish daily and weekly goals. If you are rejected for a job position, ask the interviewer for feedback. Their feedback can help you improve your job hunting skills.

5) Network: Tell the people you know that you are looking for a new job. But phrase it in a positive way like, “I am looking for a career that will allow me to use my strengths to improve a business” rather than whining, “I lost my job. Do you know anyone who is hiring?” Stay in touch with colleagues (especially your previous manager) so you are on their mind if re-hire opportunities come up.

6) Get your mindset right: It isn’t just about thinking positively, it’s about acting positively. Tackle the things you’ve been putting off in other areas of your life. Act, feel productive, and your stress will be reduced.

7) Expand your skills: Finish your degree, apprentice, hone your strengths. This will make you more appealing to future employers.

8 ) Take a platform job: Go ahead a take a job that you are over-qualified for. Do what it takes to feed you and your family. Look at it not as a step down, but as an opportunity to network with new people while you continue to search for your ultimate job. Or wow your employer so much that they promote you.

9) Volunteer: Show future employers concrete activities you’ve performed during your lay-off that demonstrate initiative and skill-building. Be an awesome volunteer and you might impress someone at the organization so much that they will offer you a paying job. (Note: if you are receiving unemployment benefits, check to see whether volunteering impacts your eligibility.)

10) Start your business: Now that you have the time to investigate this option, utilize the many free resources available for those who are interested in starting a business.

Tory Johnson, CEO for Women For Hire and author of Will Work from Home: Earn the Cash–Without the Commute, shared her “job club” tips. A job club is a group that motivates one another, networks, supports, and helps each other keep accountable. Click here to learn more about forming a job club.

Johnson also suggests:

  • expand your search – create different resumes targeting your different skills
  • create a LinkedIn profile and ask people to write recommendations for you
  • update your resume and make it look like you are doing things rather than waiting around for a job to come to you
  • freelance

Resume Mistakes:

  • One size fits all – you should customize for each job application
  • rehashes your experience – highlight your successes instead
  • outdated and overblown – your resume needs to be current and concise
  • unexplained gaps – address employment gaps using volunteerism, education, etc.
  • submit and wait – you need to submit and HUSTLE!

Johnson also discussed stay-at-home mom jobs that allow women to take care of their kids while earning an income. Here are some of the online resources she suggested:

Direct sales (through established companies, like Tupperware parties):

Promote your expertise:

Soft Skills / Care giving:

Hard Skills:

Online Selling (convert your clutter like designer clothing, old cell phones, and movies into cash):

Craft sales:

  • Creative Etsy.com users sell $12 million dollars worth of their hand-crafted products!

I hope you find my notes and these resources helpful. Please leave additional ideas in the comment section below. For more money making and saving ideas, please head on over to the recent Carnival of Personal Finance!

{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

J .Schmidt April 17, 2009 at 2:52 pm

Care.com is also a great place to find jobs in spaces other than child care. They offer tutoring and lessons, housekeeping, pet care, and short or temporary jobs too.

Reply

stacey April 17, 2009 at 7:21 pm

Good advice. time to hit the big job boards -

http://www.linkedin.com (professional networking)
http://www.indeed.com (aggregated listings)
http://www.realmatch.com (matches you to jobs)

good luck to all.

Reply

C. Smith April 18, 2009 at 8:15 pm

GoNannies.com is another great site to find childcare, housekeeping, personal assistant, senior care, and other care jobs throughout the U.S.

Reply

Daniel Hamilton April 19, 2009 at 5:36 am

Who is hiring? Who cares start working for yourself. You can have your own service that every home, business and auto needs. Join UpholsteryCleaningExperts.com #1 in Google, Yahoo and MSN search engines. For $2,995 you receive new equipment to clean carpet and upholstery, training, exclusive 10 zip code territory and lots of leads and promotion. visit http://www.UpholsteryCleaningFranchise.com and http://www.TuPropioTrabajo.com

Reply

Moneymonk April 20, 2009 at 12:22 pm

“……….reports that it is taking 120 days on average to land a job”

That’s true, and it more like 8 months if you are over 40, I hear

Reply

Sarah April 22, 2009 at 11:00 pm

HCA is a great company to work for. I temped with them until the birth of my baby, and even though they knew I was quitting the instant I went into labor, they could not have been more accomodating. I was frequently asked if I needed a better chair, or if my back was bothering me, or if my workstation was set up comfortable enough.

I felt like a Queen, and having temped at a half dozen companies in my Southern town when I first moved her, I can say that their behavior was rare.

Reply

Associated Content April 24, 2009 at 2:15 pm

I have written for Associated Content for over three years. I can certainly say that AC has been the one company that has remained tried and true and has certainly helped me financially when I was looking for work. If you can write, you can make a nice small supplemental income on Associated Content.

Reply

Kristy Kempinger April 26, 2009 at 9:56 am

Just found your blog recently and love it! I turned my hobby (making glass beads) into supplemental income and have been using Etsy since 2006. It truly is an amazing online marketplace for handmade items. Anyone who is just starting out there can feel free to contact me for any questions about how to use the site.
http://chickadeebeads.etsy.com

Reply

Jerry April 30, 2009 at 4:03 pm

Wal-Mart might be hiring, but I wouldn’t choose to work there unless I had to. They have a bad track record among my friends who have worked there re: pay and insurance benefits, which leads me to some hesitation. Still, if it’s all that is available…
Jerry

Reply

Maria -- WAHM May 28, 2009 at 3:18 pm

Online writing and marketing is a growing field and there is very good income potential even for freelancers.

Reply

Sienna June 19, 2010 at 12:05 am

College students and grads should try checking http://www.barefootstudent.com. Students can offer services such as childcare and moving labor or browse jobs posted by employers or households. Thousand of internships are listed as well…

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: