Life is a Dance

by Millionaire Mommy Next Door on December 5, 2009

in Be Your Own Boss,Happiness,Success Principles

You know what you want. If anything was possible, you know what you would do.

What is holding you back?

More times than not, I realize that barriers are self-imposed and that obstacles are meant to be navigated around. Then one of two things happen:

  1. I push ahead, jump over the obstacles, and do what it is that I really want to do — because the dance feels awesome; getting ever closer to the finish line feels awesome.
  2. I recognize that I don’t want to do it bad enough. Sometimes I impose barriers because I want an excuse for not doing it — because the dance to the finish line doesn’t energize or excite me.

And sometimes I start the dance feeling all happy, light-headed and giddy and then over time, I get bored with the repetitive steps and I want to quit before the song is over. Does this make me a quitter? Shouldn’t I push on through the boring, repetitive steps and see it to the end? Or is this an indication that I am ready to tackle a new dance or create a new twist to a beloved old favorite?

I’ve shared this internal dialog with me, myself and I on many occasions. It is always a process: I take a breather, write in my journal, make pro and con lists, weigh my options, ask friends and family for feedback, daydream. Some of the people in my life don’t understand my process — they say I think too much. But it works for me. Once I remain still for awhile and listen carefully, a catchy new tune floats my way. I tap my feet and sway to the beat, and I move.

I am my life’s choreographer.

What about you: What stops you from doing what you want to do? Do you feel obligated to finish what you’ve started? Are you a planner or a leaper? Do you enjoy the journey? How do you feel when you reach your finish line?

(Email subscribers, you’ll need to click on the post title to view the relevant video embedded on my blog page.)

{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

John DeFlumeri Jr December 6, 2009 at 3:09 pm

I’ve made hundreds of learp and thousands of plans. The best course is plan first than leap onto the good ones. Think things out, and see the end zone at all times, it keeps you going.

John DeFlumeri Jr

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Evan December 6, 2009 at 3:28 pm

When I haven’t finished what I’ve started it’s usually turned out to be a mistake. A few times I’ve persisted WAY too long.

At the moment I’m looking for how to increase my readership and sales as a blogger. I can’t multiply my results by ten by doing the same things (I don’t have ten times the time).

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Laura B December 7, 2009 at 12:16 am

I am more of a scanner and a leaper. I have a rough idea of where I want to go and then stay on the look out for the next step. When I don’t act it is usually out of fear but lately I have been taking the leap more and more often when my gut says go for this one. The more often I do this the better I get at seeing those short windows of opportunity. I think too many people try to stay safely in their comfort zones. What I’ve learned by jumping in and flying by the seat of my pants is that I can tolerate a good deal of being in unknown territory and that I get better at it the more I do it. The old “Feel the Fear and do it Anyhow.”

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Beth L. Gainer December 7, 2009 at 11:27 am

This was a very inspirational posting. I am currently working on a big undertaking — a book and its proposal — and I must admit that while it would be great to enjoy the process, not just the destination, I find self-doubt creeping in. Your posting reminded me to seize opportunities, don’t hold back, and to enjoy the process.

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Little House December 8, 2009 at 9:38 am

I’ve also stepped to the beat of a different drummer and sometimes had to change course now and then. I’ve recently gone back to school for a teaching credential at a time when our state’s education system is falling apart due to a lack of money. So now, I’m having lengthy discussions with myself (quietly, of course) about whether I should spend the money and complete my goal. I’m sure I’ll be able to decide within the next few months and make the right decisions, whatever that may be!

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Moneymonk December 15, 2009 at 3:50 pm

Oh I so love that video. What a great analogy! That is life wrap up in about 2 minutes

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medicinesux December 15, 2009 at 10:42 pm

Fantastic video! It was like watching part of my own life story play out right before my eyes. What a lesson for all to learn before it is too late. Thanks for pointing this video out to us.

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Natalie December 16, 2009 at 10:41 am

I am an information JUNKIE! I read, and learn, then read, and learn some more, but I’m too scared to follow through. I have abandoned many ideas in this manner. I always start hearing a new tune like you do, and start dancing, but never finish the dance.

I’m determined to follow through to the end this time, and I’m here for inspiration. This is my first visit. Looks like you were expecting me ;-)

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Tera December 16, 2009 at 11:53 am

Your post hits my current challenge–finishing a dissertation to earn my PhD when the lure of writing another book, developing my energy coaching practice, and starting a blog is so much more exciting… I have had to get connected emotionally with the end goal–earning the degree.

I write about this process at http://thrivingmomma.com.

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Riley December 22, 2009 at 12:39 pm

I feel that this video hits it right on the head! Its all about enjoying the journey, not focusing on solely on the destination.
I am going to share this same video on my blog http://www.mytworichuncles.blogspot.com because i feel it has a great message.

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Adhis January 24, 2010 at 3:44 pm

Usually, what gets in my way is that EVERYTHING seems so cool to me. I want to do everything! Often times, as I’m being there and doing a thing, I realize the thing becomes boring to me, or it doesn’t produce the joy I thought it would.

What stops me from doing what I want to do now? Not wanting to waste time on boring, which leads me sometimes to waste time on analysis.

You asked about the finish line:
I used to feel guilty for not finishing what I started, but I learned from an experience as a foster parent that sometimes the finish line is not the finish line I imagined. I might expect the finish line to be some desired result, when, sometimes, the finish line is a message or lesson that descends upon me
during the mission. Any work after that is essentially stubborn dawdling.

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